7937

Outcomes Associated with Obesity for All Hospitalizations Among Kids in United States,2006

Sunday, October 18, 2009
Constitution Ballroom C (Grand Hyatt)
Veerajalandhar Allareddy, MD, MBA, Pediatric Critical Care and Pharmacology, University Hospitals, Rainbow Babies Children's Hospital., Cleveland, OH, Sankeerth Rampa, BE, Nance College of Business Administration, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH and Veerasathpurush Allareddy, BDS, MBA, PhD, Dental Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, MA

Purpose: The increasing prevalence of obesity and associated co-morbid conditions pose a significant challenge to health care charges and delivery, especially among children and adolescents in United States. The objective of this study was to examine the association between obesity and outcomes (including hospital charges and length of stay in hospital) during all hospitalizations among kids aged 20 years and younger in the United States.

Methods: The Kids data for the year 2006 provided by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was used. All hospitalizations (Unweighted N = 3,131,324) were selected for analysis.  Kids with a co-morbid condition of obesity were identified. A multivariable matching approach was used were in kids with obesity were matched on age, sex, race,  insurance status, type of admission, primary diagnosis, diagnosis related group, co-morbid condition severity, and hospital with those who were not obese. Non-parametric paired sample tests (Wilcoxon signed rank test and McNemar test) were used to compare the outcomes between obese and non-obese patients.

Results: Among the 3,131,324 hospitalizations, a total of 31,792 hospitalizations had obesity. Multivariable matching approach resulted in 11,369 obese hospitalizations being matched to their exact controls. Patients who were obese had close to $1,300 in extra hospital charges and half a day longer length of stay in hospitals (p<0.001) as compared to those who were not obese.

Conclusion: Obese patients were associated with marginally higher hospital charges and length of stay compared to non-obese patients for all hospitalizations in children and adolescents in United States.